Ohio University professor to face Senate incumbent
Democratic leaders in a five-county area have selected an Ohio University professor with a doctorate in economics education from Fairfield County to challenge the incumbent Republican, Tim Schaffer, R-Lancaster, for the 31st Ohio Senate District on the November ballot. Dennis Lupher, 72, replaces Chelsea Back, of Alexandria, who withdrew on July 22.
Larry Blair, Fairfield County Democratic Party campaign committee chairman, told the Eagle-Gazette Lupher was a great a choice for the party.
"The main issue in this election is going to be the economy," Blair said. "Dennis is a man who understands economics. He understands tax structures. He also knows how education and jobs impact each other."
Lupher's candidacy paperwork was filed Friday morning at the Licking County Board of Elections.
Schaffer, 47, said his campaign is focused on job creation and beating the recession. He told the newspaper that he wants to "reduce government red tape and the expansion of state government that is hurting job production."
Democratic leaders in a five-county area have selected an Ohio University professor with a doctorate in economics education from Fairfield County to challenge the incumbent Republican, Tim Schaffer, R-Lancaster, for the 31st Ohio Senate District on the November ballot. Dennis Lupher, 72, replaces Chelsea Back, of Alexandria, who withdrew on July 22.
Larry Blair, Fairfield County Democratic Party campaign committee chairman, told the Eagle-Gazette Lupher was a great a choice for the party.
"The main issue in this election is going to be the economy," Blair said. "Dennis is a man who understands economics. He understands tax structures. He also knows how education and jobs impact each other."
Lupher's candidacy paperwork was filed Friday morning at the Licking County Board of Elections.
Schaffer, 47, said his campaign is focused on job creation and beating the recession. He told the newspaper that he wants to "reduce government red tape and the expansion of state government that is hurting job production."